Woman in White

Woman in White A folk tale with many variations. The most famous is a Mexican story about La Llorona – the Sobbing Woman. The story takes place long ago when a beautiful Indian princess, Don a Luisa de Loveros, fell in love with a handsome Mexican nobleman named Don Nuna de Montesclaros. The princess loved the nobleman deeply and had two children by him, but Montesclaros refused to marry her. When he finally deserted her and married another woman, Dona Luisa went mad with rage and stabbed her two children. Authorities found her wandering the street, sobbing, her clothes covered in blood. She was charged with infanticide and sent to the gallows. Ever since, it is said, the ghost of La Llorona walks the country at night in her bloody dress, crying out for her murdered children. If she finds any child, she’s likely to carry it away with her to the nether regions, where her own spirit dwells.Two conflicting stories are told about this ghost. In one version, the lady was a newlywed who was killed along with her husband on her wedding night when their car skidded out of control and crashed into a tree in the park. In another version, the couple were on their way to a prom when their limousine crashed; the boy lived but the girl died, and she is allegedly still looking for her prom date. Another involves “The White Lady,” a woman who was affianced to a miner from Bodie. On his way to trade his gold for cash, he rented room #19 at the Bridgeport Inn in nearby Bridgeport and left his fiancé in the safety of the inn, as he felt it too dangerous for her to accompany him on his journey. Unfortunately, the miner was robbed and killed on his way to claim his fortune. Upon hearing of his demise, distraught and unsure of what to do next, the White Lady hung herself in her room. An apparition of a woman dressed in white (possibly in a wedding dress) is said to walk the halls of the Bridgeport Inn to this day, waiting for her lover’s return.

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